The Walt Disney Company (DIS)

Walt Disney World entry sign
Gerard McGovern / Wikimedia Commons

Entertainment giant Disney is one of the more obvious post-COVID reopening stocks, but it hasn’t exactly shown obvious signs of recovery -- until today.

In the company’s quarterly report this morning, adjusted earnings of $0.80 per share easily topped estimates while revenue jumped 45% to a whopping $17 billion.

Management also said that Disney+ -- the company’s key streaming service -- now has 116 million subscribers, nicely ahead of the 114.5 million that analysts were expecting.

“We’re pleased to see more encouraging signs of recovery across our businesses, and we remain focused on ramping up our operations while also fueling long-term growth for the Company,” said CEO Bob Chapek in the report.

With the stock still essentially flat for 2021 and trading a cheapish price-to-sales of 5.5, now might be an opportune time to bet on that optimism.

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Comcast (CMCSA)

Comcast building sign
Mike Mozart / Flickr

Telecom behemoth Comcast is another “blue chip” stock that is benefitting from the steady relaxation of COVID restrictions.

The company is best known for being a cable provider, but its diverse portfolio also includes film studio and theme park assets, which both saw a nice bump last quarter.

In Q2, adjusted EBITDA at NBCUniversal improved 13% while theme parks delivered their first profitable quarter since Q1 2020, driven primarily by Universal Orlando.

Management even repurchased 8.8 million of its common shares for $500 million.

“I have great confidence in our strategy and our ability to execute, which is reflected in our decision to restart our share repurchase program during the quarter, earlier than previously planned,” said Chairman and CEO Brian Roberts.

Comcast shares are only up 5% over the past months, so there might be plenty of room left to run.

Hilton Worldwide Holdings (HLT)

View of Hilton resort
Hilton Hotels & Resorts / YouTube

No post-pandemic stock list would be complete without mentioning a hotel operator. And with 6,500 properties in 119 countries, Hilton Worldwide Holdings is one of the biggest and best-run of the bunch.

Wider distribution of vaccinations and the easing of travel restrictions have given Hilton’s financials a much-needed boost, and the trend should only continue.

In the most recent quarter, system-wide comparable revenue per available room -- a key metric in the industry -- spiked 234% on higher occupancy.

The company also approved 25,900 new rooms for development, bringing Hilton’s development pipeline to greater than 400,000 rooms.

“While the pace of recovery varies by region, particularly with the uncertainty surrounding coronavirus variants, we expect continued strength in leisure demand and further upticks in business travel to drive continued resurgence in the back half of the year,” said President and CEO Christopher Nassetta.

Hilton shares have risen just 4% over the past three months.

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How to get in the game

Using stock market app on phone
apichart_p / Twenty20

You don’t need a whole lot of money to invest in these stocks.

If you’re working with a smaller budget, you may want to use an investing app that allows you to buy “slices” of shares for big-name companies like the ones mentioned — especially one that comes with no fees or commissions.

Another low-budget option is using an app that allows you to invest with just your “spare change," rounding up to the nearest dollar on all your purchases to help you build a diversified portfolio over time.

Fine art as an investment

Stocks can be volatile, cryptos make big swings to either side, and even gold is not immune to the market’s ups and downs.

That’s why if you are looking for the ultimate hedge, it could be worthwhile to check out a real, but overlooked asset: fine art.

Contemporary artwork has outperformed the S&P 500 by a commanding 174% over the past 25 years, according to the Citi Global Art Market chart.

And it’s becoming a popular way to diversify because it’s a real physical asset with little correlation to the stock market.

On a scale of -1 to +1, with 0 representing no link at all, Citi found the correlation between contemporary art and the S&P 500 was just 0.12 during the past 25 years.

Earlier this year, Bank of America investment chief Michael Harnett singled out artwork as a sharp way to outperform over the next decade — due largely to the asset’s track record as an inflation hedge.

Investing in art by the likes of Banksy and Andy Warhol used to be an option only for the ultrarich. But with a new investing platform, you can invest in iconic artworks just like Jeff Bezos and Bill Gates do.

About the Author

Brian Pacampara, CFA

Brian Pacampara, CFA

Investing Editor

Brian is an editor for MoneyWise. A long-time stock junkie, his work has appeared in The Motley Fool, Seeking Alpha, and Yahoo Finance. He believes in owning "Forever Stocks" — a rare group of businesses that have paid out dividends for decades. Brian holds the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) designation.

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