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Younger generations under financial pressure

Over half of the total parents surveyed believe that the tough economic climate means their adult kids need more financial support. And they aren’t wrong.

The Pew Research Centre discovered that it’s taking young adults much longer to reach key milestones, like having a full-time job and living on their own. Their most recent data shows that 68% of 25-year-olds were living outside their parents’ home in 2021, compared with 84% in 1980.

Between student loan debt, high rents and wage stagnation, it’s taking young adults longer and longer to become financially independent. And 84% of parents that USA Today surveyed are happy to support their kids if they can help them get through this tough time.

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Supporting kids can hurt parents

Even if parents don’t mind giving their kids a helping hand, 1 in 3 told USA Today that it puts them under “financial strain.”

With the aging population, more and more people are finding it hard to save for retirement. In fact, 28% Americans have nothing saved for retirement, according to the most recent Federal Reserve numbers.

Experts say you need to have enough money in retirement so that you can withdraw between 4% and 5% from that nest egg every year. That’s quite a bit of money to save – especially if you’ve pouring your extra income into your kids.

So which is more important to you: yours or your kids’ financial future?

Suze Orman says stop

Personal finance celebrity Suze Orman has heard this all before – and she’s not a fan of it. Orman worries for the future retirees who are spending possible 401(k) contributions on their kids’ lives.

She wants parents to prioritize their own wealth. When she sat down with Moneywise in May, she advised parents to say this to their adult kids:

“I am no longer your bank account! I'm getting to the point where I need my money to be able to support myself. You are old enough now to go out and figure it out. So don't come to me for money.”

Orman also encourages you to cut your expenses so you can aggressively save and reap the rewards of compound interest in your 401(k).

Social Security isn’t enough to support you in your old age, so you may have to kick your kids off the account in order to look out for yourself.

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About the Author

Sabina Wex

Sabina Wex

Reporter

Sabina Wex is a writer and podcast producer in Toronto. Her work has appeared in Business Insider, Fast Company, CBC and more.

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The content provided on Moneywise is information to help users become financially literate. It is neither tax nor legal advice, is not intended to be relied upon as a forecast, research or investment advice, and is not a recommendation, offer or solicitation to buy or sell any securities or to adopt any investment strategy. Tax, investment and all other decisions should be made, as appropriate, only with guidance from a qualified professional. We make no representation or warranty of any kind, either express or implied, with respect to the data provided, the timeliness thereof, the results to be obtained by the use thereof or any other matter.