Home Depot

People shopping at Home Depot in San Francisco bay area
Sundry Photography/Shutterstock

Home Depot (NYSE:HD) isn’t nearly as exciting as crypto, but it’s the top holding at OUSA, accounting for 5.3% of the fund’s weight.

The home improvement retail giant has around 2,300 stores, with each one averaging approximately 105,000 square feet of indoor retail space — a size that dwarfs most of its competitors.

One thing that makes Home Depot stand out is how well it performed during the pandemic.

Many brick-and-mortar retailers have struggled since the beginning of COVID-19. Yet Home Depot grew its sales nearly 20% in fiscal 2020 to $132.1 billion.

It even boosted its quarterly dividend by 10% earlier this year and now yields 1.9%.

Shares aren’t cheap, though.

After rallying more than 30% year to date, Home Depot trades at over $350 per share. But you can get a piece of the company using a popular stock trading app that allows you to buy fractions of shares with as much money as you are willing to spend.

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Microsoft

Microsoft sign on the new office building in Vancouver, Canada
Volodymyr Kyrylyuk/Shutterstock

Tech stocks aren’t known for their dividends, but software gorilla **Microsoft **(Nasdaq:MSFT) is an exception.

The company announced an 11% increase to its quarterly dividend to 62 cents per share last month. Over the past five years, its payout has grown by 59%.

So it shouldn’t come as a surprise that Microsoft is the second largest holding in O’Leary’s OUSA.

Business has been booming of late, largely helped by the pandemic-fueled demand for its cloud-computing and video gaming

In the fiscal year ended June 30, 2021, Microsoft's revenue grew 18% to $168.1 billion while adjusted EPS surged 38% to $7.97.

Year to date, Microsoft shares have returned a whopping 40%, easily topping other trillion-dollar tech giants like Apple (11.8%) and Amazon (7%).

Of course, if you’re on the fence about jumping into tech stocks near all-time highs, some investing apps will give you a free share of Apple just for signing up.

Johnson & Johnson

A health worker prepares to administer a shot of the American vaccine Johnson and Johnson.
Golden Shrimp/Shutterstock

Healthcare is known as a recession-proof industry.

With deeply entrenched positions in consumer health, pharmaceuticals, and medical devices, Johnson & Johnson (NYSE:JNJ) has been able to deliver remarkably consistent returns to investors through thick and thin.

Not only does Johnson & Johnson post recurring profits year in and year out, but it grows them consistently, as well: Over the last 20 years, Johnson & Johnson’s adjusted earnings have increased at an average annual rate of 8%.

Things are even better on the dividend front — the healthcare giant has raised its payout to shareholders for 59 consecutive years.

Not many companies have that kind of track record.

Year to date, shares are up just 3%. But for long-term investors, Johnson & Johnson is a name that should not be ignored.

The company is the third-largest holding in OUSA with a weighting of 4.9%.

While commercial real estate to has always been reserved for a few elite investors, outperforming the S&P 500 over a 25-year period, First National Realty Partners allows you to access institutional-quality commercial real estate investments — without the leg work of finding deals yourself.

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O’Leary’s other ‘fine’ asset

Gold, crypto, and common stocks aren’t the only things you’ll find in Mr. Wonderful’s portfolio.

He also utilizes a "private" way to diversify and to profit.

If you want to invest in something that has very little correlation with the violent swings of the stock and crypto market, consider this overlooked asset — fine art.

Investing in fine art by the likes of Banksy and Andy Warhol used to be an option only for the ultra-rich like O’Leary.

But with a new investing platform, you can invest in iconic artworks too, just like Jeff Bezos and Peggy Guggenheim.

According to the Citi Global Art Market chart, contemporary artwork has offered a return of 14% per year over the past 25 years, easily topping the 9.5% annual return from the S&P 500.

Fine art as an investment

Stocks can be volatile, cryptos make big swings to either side, and even gold is not immune to the market’s ups and downs.

That’s why if you are looking for the ultimate hedge, it could be worthwhile to check out a real, but overlooked asset: fine art.

Contemporary artwork has outperformed the S&P 500 by a commanding 174% over the past 25 years, according to the Citi Global Art Market chart.

And it’s becoming a popular way to diversify because it’s a real physical asset with little correlation to the stock market.

On a scale of -1 to +1, with 0 representing no link at all, Citi found the correlation between contemporary art and the S&P 500 was just 0.12 during the past 25 years.

Earlier this year, Bank of America investment chief Michael Harnett singled out artwork as a sharp way to outperform over the next decade — due largely to the asset’s track record as an inflation hedge.

Investing in art by the likes of Banksy and Andy Warhol used to be an option only for the ultrarich. But with a new investing platform, you can invest in iconic artworks just like Jeff Bezos and Bill Gates do.

About the Author

Jing Pan

Jing Pan

Investment Reporter

Jing is an investment reporter for MoneyWise. Prior to joining the team, he was a research analyst and editor at one of the leading financial publishing companies in North America. An avid advocate of investing for passive income, he wrote a monthly dividend stock newsletter for the better half of the past decade. Jing holds a Master’s Degree in Economics and an Honours Bachelor of Science Degree, both from the University of Toronto.

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