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Bank of America (BAC)

Let’s start with a bank stock. Why? While many sectors fear rising interest rates, banks look forward to them.

Central banks hike interest rates to tame inflation.

Banks lend money at higher rates than they borrow, pocketing the difference. When interest rates increase, the spread for how much a bank earns widens.

And it just so happens that quite a few banks, such as Bank of America, have upped their payouts to shareholders over the past year.

In July, Bank of America boosted its quarterly dividend 17% to 21 cents per share. That gives the company an annual yield of 2.4% at the current share price.

The stock market had a sluggish start in 2022 and Bank of America is down 22% year to date. But a major rebound could be on the horizon. Goldman Sachs has a Buy rating on the company and a price target of $51 – roughly 43% above where the stock sits today.

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Southern Co. (SO)

Moving up the yield ladder is Southern, a gas and electric utility holding company headquartered in Atlanta. It serves close to 9 million customers.

The utility sector is known for being a defensive play — and not just against inflation. Come what may, people still need to heat their homes in the winter and turn the lights on at night.

The recession-proof nature of the business means Southern can pay reliable dividends.

In April, the company boosted its quarterly payout by 2 cents per share to 68 cents per share, marking the 21st consecutive year that Southern has increased its dividend.

Look further back, and you’ll see that the company has paid steady or increasing dividends since 1948.

In 2021, Southern earned an adjusted profit of $3.41 per share, up 5% from 2020. Management expects adjusted earnings per share for 2022 to be in the range of $3.50 to $3.60.

Trading at $74 apiece, Southern stock offers a solid annual yield of 3.7%.

In April, Wells Fargo analyst Neil Kalton raised his price target on Southern from $68 to $80. While he kept an Equal Weight rating on the shares, the new price target implies a potential upside of 8.1%.

Global Partners (GLP)

If you really want oversized yields, you may have to look at the lesser-known stocks — like Global Partners.

Structured as a master limited partnership, Global Partners is one of the largest independent owners, suppliers and operators of gas stations and convenience stores in the Northeast.

At the same time, it is a leading wholesale distributor of fuel products and is involved in transporting petroleum products and renewable fuels by rail from the mid-continental U.S. and Canada.

The business pays quarterly distributions of 59.5 cents per unit, which comes out to a staggering annual yield of 8.7%.

In the trailing 12 months as of Mar. 31, Global Partners’ distributable cash flow covered its payout 1.7 times after factoring in distributions to its preferred unitholders.

With a market cap of less than $1 billion, Global Partners doesn’t get as much Wall Street coverage as the previous two. However, the sheer size of its distribution yield makes the stock worthy of further research.

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More from MoneyWise

Fine art as an investment

Stocks can be volatile, cryptos make big swings to either side, and even gold is not immune to the market’s ups and downs.

That’s why if you are looking for the ultimate hedge, it could be worthwhile to check out a real, but overlooked asset: fine art.

Contemporary artwork has outperformed the S&P 500 by a commanding 174% over the past 25 years, according to the Citi Global Art Market chart.

And it’s becoming a popular way to diversify because it’s a real physical asset with little correlation to the stock market.

On a scale of -1 to +1, with 0 representing no link at all, Citi found the correlation between contemporary art and the S&P 500 was just 0.12 during the past 25 years.

Earlier this year, Bank of America investment chief Michael Harnett singled out artwork as a sharp way to outperform over the next decade — due largely to the asset’s track record as an inflation hedge.

Investing in art by the likes of Banksy and Andy Warhol used to be an option only for the ultrarich. But with a new investing platform, you can invest in iconic artworks just like Jeff Bezos and Bill Gates do.

About the Author

Jing Pan

Jing Pan

Investment Reporter

Jing is an investment reporter for MoneyWise. Prior to joining the team, he was a research analyst and editor at one of the leading financial publishing companies in North America. An avid advocate of investing for passive income, he wrote a monthly dividend stock newsletter for the better half of the past decade. Jing holds a Master’s Degree in Economics and an Honours Bachelor of Science Degree, both from the University of Toronto.

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