Fine art

Fine Art Investment
@Tintim via Twenty20

It’s easy to see why art pieces often fetch new highs at auctions: The supply of the best works of art is limited, and many paintings have already been bought by museums and collectors.

In fact, art could do more than just help you hedge against inflation.

Contemporary artwork has outperformed the S&P 500 by a commanding 174% over the past 25 years, according to the Citi Global Art Market chart.

Artwork is becoming a popular way to diversify because it's a "real" physical asset with little correlation to the stock market.

According to Deloitte’s latest Art & Finance Report, 85% of wealth managers in 2021 believed art should be included as part of a wealth management service.

It’s true that investing in fine art by the likes of Banksy and Andy Warhol used to be an option only for the ultra-rich. But with a new investing platform, you can invest in iconic artworks too, just like Jeff Bezos and Peggy Guggenheim.

More: How to invest in fine art?.

Fine wine is a sweet comfort in any situation — and now it can make your investment portfolio a little more comfortable, too. Now a platform called Vinovest helps everyday buyers invest in fine wines — no sommelier certification required.

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Fine wine

red wine is poured into crystal goblets
@luca.mara / Twenty20

As time goes by, bottles of fine wine become rarer and generally more valuable.

According to Credit Suisse, if you invested $200 in the wine market in 1960, your investment could be worth a whopping $480,000. Had you invested that $100 into the stock market, it would only be worth a modest $130,000.

You can invest in wine by purchasing individual bottles — but you’ll need a place to store them properly. Residential wine cellars often cost tens of thousands of dollars. If not stored at the right temperature or humidity, the bottle could be compromised.

That’s why some investors choose to go with a wine investing platform. The company would buy fine wine at below-retail prices through its connections and they handle the storage for you. Your bottles would also be insured against breakage and loss.

And because you actually own the bottles, you can always have the wine shipped to you to enjoy if you so desire.

Farmland

Aerial view of endless lush pastures and farmlands of Ireland. Beautiful Irish countryside with emerald green fields and meadows. Rural landscape on sunset.
MNStudio / Shutterstock

The wealthy elites have amassed farmland since the beginning of recorded history.

Today, Bill Gates — the fourth richest person in the world, with a net worth of $136.9 billion — is the largest private farmland owner in the U.S.

You don’t need an MBA to see the appeal: Farmland is intrinsically valuable and has little correlation with the ups and downs of the stock market. And even in a hyperinflationary environment, people still need to eat.

Between 1992 and 2020, U.S. farmland returned an average of 11% per year. Over the same time frame, the S&P 500 returned only 8% annually.

Thankfully, you no longer need to be a millionaire to get a piece of the action.

And there’s an online platform that allows you to buy stakes in individual U.S. farms. You’ll earn cash income from the leasing fees and crop sales. And of course, you’ll benefit from any long-term appreciation on top of that.

Fine wine is a sweet comfort in any situation — and now it can make your investment portfolio a little more comfortable, too. Now a platform called Vinovest helps everyday buyers invest in fine wines — no sommelier certification required.

Invest Now

Luxury and exotic vehicles

Investing in luxury and exotic vehicles
@SnappyPete / Twenty20

Thanks to the still-historically low interest rate environment, earning a passive income is not so easy these days.

Savings accounts pay next to nothing. And the average dividend yield of S&P 500 companies was a measly 1.4%.

If you want to invest in something without the violent swings of the S&P 500, take a look at some alternative assets.

Traditionally, investing in things like exotic vehicles or multi-family apartments have only been options for the top 1%.

But with the help of new platforms, these kinds of opportunities are now available to retail investors, too.

With a single investment, you can build a fixed-income portfolio spread across multiple asset classes.

More: Luxury asset investing

Real estate

American suburb
@MargJohnsonVA via Twenty20

As a well-known inflation-proof asset, real estate rounds out the list.

Owning land and properties has helped people preserve their purchasing power for centuries. And today, you don’t have to buy a property to build a real estate portfolio.

Publicly traded REITs give investors convenient exposure to income-producing real estate.

And if REITs don’t provide the stability you’re looking for, there are more “private” ways to get involved.

For instance, some popular investing services make it possible to lock in a steady rental income stream by investing in premium real estate properties, from commercial developments in Los Angeles to residential apartments in NYC.

You’ll gain access to high-end properties that are typically off-limits to retail investors, and you’ll receive regular payouts in the form of quarterly dividend distributions.

Get a piece of commercial real estate

Enhance your portfolio with high-return commercial real estate

First National Realty Partners is the #1 option for accredited investors seeking superior risk-adjusted returns in the grocery-anchored necessity-based retail space.

While commercial real estate has always been reserved for a few elite investors, outperforming the S&P 500 over a 25-year period, First National Realty Partners allows you to access institutional-quality commercial real estate investments — without the leg work of finding deals yourself.

Invest with First National Realty Partners now.

About the Author

Dana Sitar, CEPF®

Dana Sitar, CEPF®

Freelance Contributor

Dana Sitar has been writing and editing since 2011, covering personal finance, careers and digital media. She’s written about work and money for The New York Times, Forbes, CNBC, The Motley Fool, a column for Inc. and more.

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