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Most American workers can't get pensions anymore, though state and local government employees are an exception. But their pensions — providing regular income in retirement — have become a costly burden for states and their citizens.

Many state pension plans, covering government workers at both the state and local level, are underfunded. There's not enough money to pay all the benefits promised to current and future retirees, and residents might one day have to cough up more tax dollars to cover those costs.

Using data from the Pew Charitable Trusts, the Foundation for Economic Education, and Governing.com, we've ranked the states, going from those with the healthiest pensions systems to the ones with the biggest pension problems — potentially for taxpayers.

Editor's note: Governing.com's numbers of state and local government employees per state have been rounded and doubled, since the data excluded education workers. Governing says they account for roughly half of each workforce.

50. Wisconsin

Wisconsin state capital in Madison Wisconsin
Randy Kostichka / Shutterstock
The Wisconsin Capitol building.

The pension program in Wisconsin is **102.6% funded **and has a $2.6 billion surplus.

There is no pension gap in Wisconsin. The pension fund will provide enough money to pay out all of the retirement benefits that have been promised to state and local government employees in Wisconsin.

In this state, led by Democratic Gov. Tony Evers, approximately 229,000 workers police highways, staff parks, guard prisons, teach in schools and state universities, fix roads, work in health care, and provide many other services.

49. South Dakota

Mount Rushmore National Park in the Black Hills South Dakota during a warm sunrise with clear blue sky morning. High Dynamic Range. / Mount Rushmore National Park
JJM Photography / Shutterstock
Mount Rushmore.

The pension program in South Dakota is 100.1% funded and has a $9.1 million surplus.

With no pension gap, the system has enough money to pay out all of the retirement benefits state and local government employees in South Dakota are counting on.

There are roughly 38,000 of those workers in this state, led by Republican Gov. Kristi Noem. If your employer offers no pension and no 401(k), you do have other options for saving for retirement.

48. Tennessee

Park ranger moving people away from elks during mating season in Tennessee.
Nicholas Lamontanaro / Shutterstock
A Tennessee park ranger.

The pension program in Tennessee is 96.5% funded and has $1.7 billion in debt.

To fill its pension gap, the state would need to collect $253 from each resident — adults and children. That would provide enough funding to pay out all of the retirement benefits promised to state and local government employees in Tennessee.

In this state, led by Republican Gov. Bill Lee, approximately 310,000 of those workers keep the peace, teach in schools and universities and provide many other services.

47. New York

Welcome to New York road sign
littlenySTOCK / Shutterstock
A New York highway sign.

The pension program in New York is 94.5% funded and has a $11.5 billion shortfall.

To fill its pension gap, the state would need to collect $587 from each adult and child living in New York. That would provide funding to pay out all of the retirement benefits promised to state and local government employees.

The state, led by Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo, currently has an estimated 1.2 million of those workers providing a wide range of services.

46. Idaho

Capitol building and square in Boise, Idaho
Sergey Novikov / Shutterstock
The Idaho Capitol in Boise.

The pension program in Idaho is 91.3% funded and is $1.5 billion in debt.

To bridge its pension gap, the state would need to collect $873 from each resident — including adults and children. That would provide enough funding to pay all of the retirement benefits promised to state and local government employees.

The state, led by Republican Gov. Brad Little, has roughly 74,000 of those workers policing highways, staffing parks, teaching and performing many other jobs.

45. North Carolina

Senior man sitting on rock with German Shepherd dog in a field off the Appalachian Trail on Roan Mountain border of North Carolina and Tennessee.
Cvandyke / Shutterstock
A retiree on the Appalachian Trail in North Carolina.

The pension program in North Carolina is 90.7% funded and has debt to the tune of $9.6 billion.

To fill its pension gap, North Carolina would need to collect $935 from each resident, adults and children. That would provide enough funding to pay out all of the retirement benefits state and local government workers hope to rely on.

There are around 518,000 of those workers in this state, led by Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper. Pensioners also have Social Security to fall back on and can follow strategies to maximize their benefits.

44. Utah

Welcome to Utah road sign
Maria Uspenskaya / Shutterstock
A Welcome to Utah road sign.

The pension program in Utah is 90.3% funded and has $3.4 billion in debt.

To fill its pension shortfall, the state would need to collect $1,096 from each resident — including adults and children. That would provide enough funding to pay out all of the retirement benefits promised to state and local government employees.

In this state, led by Republican Gov. Gary Herbert, about 126,000 employees police Utah highways, staff parks, guard prisons, teach in the schools and universities, and provide many other services.

43. Nebraska

Fall Color Orange Tree Leaves Nebraska State Capital Lincoln
Christopher Boswell / Shutterstock
The Nebraska Capitol building in Lincoln.

The pension program in Nebraska is 90.2% funded and is $1.5 billion in debt.

Filling the pension gap would require Nevada to collect $782 from each resident, including adults and children. That would provide enough funding to pay out all of the retirement benefits state and local government employees are counting on.

The state, led by Republican Gov. Pete Ricketts, currently has approximately 108,000 of those workers.

42. Washington

Scenic Picture lake with mount Shuksan reflection in Washington, USA
Galyna Andrushko / Shutterstock
The Mount Shuksan region in Washington state.

The pension system in Washington is just 89.6% funded and is $9.9 billion in debt.

To fill its pension gap, the state would need to collect $1,333 from each resident — including adults and children. That would provide enough funding to pay out all of promised retirement benefits.

Washington state, led by Democratic Gov. Jay Inslee, currently has about 366,000 state and local government workers.

41. Oregon

Removing the asphalt road damaged during  a 12 inch water main failure on Harvard Ave in Roseburg OR
TFoxFoto / Shutterstock
Road workers fixing a water main in Roseburg, Oregon,

The pension program in Oregon is just 83.1% funded and is $13.5 billion in the red.

To fill its pension gap, the state would need to collect $3,256 from each resident, adults and children. That would provide enough funding to pay out all of the retirement benefits promised to state and local government employees in Oregon.

This state, led by Democratic Gov. Kate Brown, currently has an estimated 190,000 of those workers fixing roads, working in health care, and providing many other services.

40. Delaware

Pink light lights the capital dome tower on top of the Delaware state capital building at night
Christopher Boswell / Shutterstock
The Delaware Capitol building in Dover.

The pension program in Delaware is just 82.8% funded and is about $2 billion in debt.

To close its pension gap, Delaware would need to collect $2,090 from each adult and child. That would provide enough funding to pay out all of the retirement benefits that have been promised.

The state, led by Democratic Gov. John Carney, currently has roughly 48,000 state and local government employees.

39. Iowa

Businessman holding a business card with Iowa State Flag
Lukasz Stefanski / Shutterstock
An Iowa state employment holding a business card.

The pension program in Iowa is just 82.3% funded and is $6.7 billion in debt.

To fill its pension gap, the state would need to collect $2,195 from each resident — including adults and children. That would provide enough funding to pay out all of the retirement benefits promised to state and local government employees in Iowa.

The state, led by Republican Gov. Kim Reynolds, currently has about 146,000 of those workers.

38. Maine

Aerial view of Bar Harbor in autumn, Maine
Joseph Sohm / Shutterstock
Bar Harbor, Maine, in autumn.

The pension program in Maine is just 81.9% funded and is about $3 billion in debt.

To close its pension shortfall, the state would need to collect $2,247 from every adult and child. That would provide enough funding to pay out all of the retirement benefits that have been promised.

The state, led by Democratic Gov. Janet Mills, currently has roughly 57,200 state and local government employees who provide a wide range of services.

37. Ohio

The Ohio Turnpike (Interstate 80) crosses the Cuyahoga Valley south of Cleveland
Kenneth Sponsler / Shutterstock
The Ohio Turnpike south of Cleveland.

The pension program in Ohio is just 80.1% funded and is $39.7 billion in debt. To fill its pension gap, the state would need to collect $4,441 from each resident, adults and children.

That would provide enough funding to pay out all of the retirement benefits that have been promised to state and local government employees.

The state, led by Republican Gov. Mike DeWine, currently has some 524,000 of those workers who police highways, staff parks, and fill many other public service jobs.

36. Florida

Tallahassee Capitol Buildings in the Afternoon
Spencer Hopkins / Shutterstock
Buildings at the Florida Capitol in Tallahassee.

The pension program in Florida is just 79.3% funded and is $40.2 billion in debt.

To fill its pension gap, the state would need to collect $1,950 from each resident — including adults and children. That would provide enough funding to pay out all of the retirement benefits that have been promised to public employees.

The state, led by Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis, currently has an estimated 849,000 state and local government workers.

35. Georgia

Atlanta Traffic
Brett Barnhill / Shutterstock
Busy traffic in Atlanta.

The pension program in Georgia is just 79.2% funded and is $22.9 billion in debt.

To fill its pension gap, the state would need to collect $2,199 from each resident — including adults and children. That would provide enough funding to pay out all of the retirement benefits that have been promised to state and local government employees.

The state, led by Republican Gov. Brian Kemp, currently has around 436,000 of those workers. They may want to open IRAs to give themselves more financial cushioning in retirement.

34. West Virginia

Blackwater Falls and a trail at Blackwater Falls State Park, West Virginia.
Jon Bilous / Shutterstock
Blackwater Falls State Park in West Virginia.

The pension program in West Virginia is just 78.9% funded and is $3.9 billion in debt.

To fill its pension gap, West Virginia would need to collect $2,146 from each resident — including adults and children. That would provide enough funding to pay out all of the retirement benefits that have been promised to public employees.

The state, led by Republican Gov. Jim Justice, currently has about 89,000 of those workers.

33. Missouri

State Capitol of Missouri in Jefferson City.
Henryk Sadura / Shutterstock
The Missouri Capitol building in Jefferson City.

The pension program in Missouri is just 77.9% funded and is $15.8 billion in debt.

To fill its pension gap, the state would need to collect $2,570 from each resident — including adults and children. That would provide enough funding to pay out all of the retirement benefits promised to state and local government employees.

The state, led by Republican Gov. Mike Parson, currently has approximately 290,000 of those workers who guard prisons, teach in schools and universities, fix roads, provide many other state services.

32. Oklahoma

A scene from rural Oklahoma. Oil pumps and hay bales in the prairie.
Richard G Smith / Shutterstock
Oil pumps and hay bales on the prairie in Oklahoma.

The pension program in Oklahoma is just 77.9% funded as is $8.5 billion in debt.

To fill its pension gap, Oklahoma would need to collect $2,161 from each resident — including adults and children. That would provide enough funding to pay out all of the promised retirement benefits.

The state, led by Republican Gov. Kevin Stitt, currently has roughly 180,000 state and local government workers.

31. Virginia

Fall at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville
Bram Reusen / Shutterstock
Autumn at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville.

The pension program in Virginia is just 77.2% funded and is running a $21.5 billion shortfall.

To fill its pension gap, the state would need to collect $2,540 from each resident — including adults and children. That would provide enough funding to pay out all of the retirement benefits that have been promised to public employees.

Virginia, led by Democratic Gov. Ralph Northam, currently has an estimated 377,000 of those workers.

30. Arkansas

Three fishermen stand on a wooden dock over a lake.  They are bream fishing.  Photo shows only their legs and shoes.
Bonita R. Cheshier / Shutterstock
Fishermen on a dock in Arkansas.

The pension program in Arkansas is just 76.9% funded and is $7.9 billion in debt.

To fill its pension gap, the state would need to collect $2,697 from each resident, adults and children. That would provide enough funding to pay out all of the promised retirement benefits.

The state, led by Republican Gov. Asa Hutchinson, currently has around 142,000 state and local government workers who provide a wide range of services, including policing and health care.

29. Texas

American and Texas state flags flying on the dome of the Texas State Capitol building in Austin
CrackerClips Stock Media / Shutterstock
The U.S. and Texas flags flying at the state Capitol in Austin.

The pension program in Texas is just 76.1% funded and is $55.1 billion in debt.

To fill its pension gap, the state would need to collect $1,945 from each resident — including adults and children. That would provide enough funding to pay out all of the retirement benefits that have been promised to public employees in Texas.

The state, led by Republican Gov. Greg Abbott, currently has roughly 1.13 million state and local government workers.

28. Wyoming

Wyoming welcome sign
Adam schachter / Shutterstock
A Wyoming welcome sign.

The pension program in Wyoming is just 75.9% funded and is $2.7 billion in debt.

To fill its pension gap, the state would need to collect $4,464 from each resident, adults and children. That would provide enough funding to pay out all of the retirement benefits promised to state and local government employees in Wyoming.

The state, led by Republican Gov. Mark Gordon, currently has about 52,000 of those workers policing highways, staffing state parks, and filling various other jobs.

27. Nevada

cityscape of Las Vegas from top view in Nevada, USA at sunset
f11photo / Shutterstock
The famed Las Vegas Strip in Nevada.

The pension program in Nevada is just 74.4% funded and is $13.3 billion in debt.

To fill its pension gap, Nevada would need to collect $4,474 from each resident — including adults and children. That would provide enough funding to pay out all of the promised retirement benefits.

The state, led by Democratic Gov. Steve Sisolak, currently has around 107,000 state and local government workers providing various public services.

26. Montana

Silhouette of man riding a horse on sunset with beautiful background.Three cowboys silhouetted against a dawn sky. Montana horse ranch
PK Studio / Shutterstock
Montana cowboys.

The pension program in Montana is just 72.8% funded and is $4.1 billion in debt.

To fill its pension gap, the state would need to collect $3,893 from each adult and child. That would provide enough funding to pay out all of the retirement benefits promised to public employees in Montana.

The state, led by Democratic Gov. Steve Bullock, currently has about 54,000 of those workers who teach, fix roads, work in health care, and provide many other services.

25. Alabama

A senior man enjoying the view on the Alabama gulf coast.
Darryl Vest / Shutterstock
A retiree at the Alabama Gulf coast.

The pension program in Alabama is just 70.9% funded and is $15.3 billion in debt.

To fill its pension gap, the state would need to collect $3,118 from each resident — including adults and children. That would provide enough funding to pay out all of the retirement benefits that have been promised to public employees in Alabama.

The state, led by Republican Gov. Kay Ivey, currently has an estimated 278,000 state and local government workers.

24. California

flight over the city in a chopper
Charles Shapiro / Shutterstock
A California Highway Patrol helicopter.

The huge pension program in California is just 68.9% funded as is $190.3 billion in debt.

To fill its pension gap, California would need to collect $6,279 from each resident — including adults and children. That would provide enough funding to pay out all of the promised retirement benefits.

America's most populous state, led by Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom, is estimated to have 1.77 million state and local government employees.

23. Maryland

The flag outside the north entrance of the Maryland State House in Annapolis, MD. where the Maryland General Assembly convenes for three months a year.
Glynnis Jones / Shutterstock
Maryland flag flying at the State House in Annapolis.

The pension program in Maryland is just 68.6% funded and is $22.6 billion in debt.

To fill its pension gap, the state would need to collect $3,751 from each resident — including adults and children. That would provide enough funding to pay out all of the retirement benefits promised to public employees in Maryland.

The state — which is notoriously tough on retirees — is led by Republican Gov. Larry Hogan and currently has approximately 268,000 state and local government workers.

22. Kansas

Two farmers in a field examining wheat crop.
PointImages / Shutterstock
Two farmers examining the wheat crop in Kansas.

The pension program in Kansas is just 67.1% funded and is $9.1 billion in debt.

To cover its pension deficit, the state would need to collect $3,161 from each resident, adults and kids. That would provide enough funding to pay out all of the retirement benefits promised to state and local government employees in Kansas.

The state, led by Democratic Gov. Laura Kelly, currently has around 158,000 of those workers providing various public services.

21. Alaska

Anchorage Skyline with a winter reflection
Rocky Grimes / Shutterstock
The Anchorage, Alaska, skyline.

The pension program in Alaska is just 66.6% funded and is $7.2 billion in debt.

To fill its pension gap, Alaska would need to collect $9,733 from each resident — including adults and children. That would provide enough funding to pay out all of the promised retirement benefits.

The state, led by Republican Gov. Mike Dunleavy, currently has roughly 58,000 state and local government employees who police highways, staff parks, and provide many other services.

20. Louisiana

Streetcar in downtown New Orleans, USA at twilight
f11photo / Shutterstock
A streetcar in downtown New Orleans.

The pension program in Louisiana is just 65.1% funded and has $18.2 billion in debt.

To fill its pension gap, the state would need to collect $3,961 from each resident, including adults and children. That would provide enough funding to pay out all of the retirement benefits public employees in Louisiana are counting on.

The state, led by Democratic Gov. John Bel Edwards, currently has an estimated 264,000 state and local government workers.

19. Michigan

A woman on the beach watching Lake Michigan
Lindsay Snow / Shutterstock
A woman on the beach at Lake Michigan.

The pension program in Michigan is just 65.1% funded and is $32.5 billion in debt.

To fill its pension gap, the state would need to collect $3,248 from each resident — including adults and children. That would provide enough funding to pay out all of the promised retirement benefits.

The state, led by Democratic Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, currently has roughly 364,000 state and local government employees who fill a wide range of jobs.

18. Indiana

Indiana State Capitol Building in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA.
Sean Pavone / Shutterstock
The Indiana Capitol in Indianapolis.

The pension program in Indiana is just 65% funded and is $17.3 billion in debt.

To close its pension gap, the state would need to collect $2,598 from each resident, adults and kids. That would provide enough funding to pay out all of the retirement benefits that have been promised to state and local government employees in Indiana.

In this state, led by Republican Gov. Eric Holcomb, there are currently about 264,000 of those workers staffing parks, guarding prisons, working in health care, and providing many other services.

17. Vermont

A welcome sign at the Vermont state line.
Katherine Welles / Shutterstock
A Vermont welcome sign.

The pension program in Vermont is just 64.3% funded and is $2.3 billion in debt.

To fill its pension gap, the state would need to collect $3,683 from each resident — including adults and children. That would provide enough funding to pay out all of the retirement benefits promised to public employees in Vermont.

The state, led by Republican Gov. Phil Scott, currently has about 30,000 of those workers.

16. North Dakota

State Capitol of North Dakota
Randall Runtsch / Shutterstock
North Dakota's State Capitol in Bismarck.

The pension program in North Dakota is just 63.8% funded and is about $3 billion in debt.

To fill its pension gap, North Dakota would need to collect $3,840 from each resident, adults and children. That would provide enough funding to pay out all of the retirement benefits that have been promised.

The state, led by Republican Gov. Doug Burgum, currently has roughly 40,000 state and local government employees.

15. Minnesota

Woman and dog in matching red jackets walking in snow after winter storm in Minnesota.
Edgar Lee Espe / Shutterstock
A woman and her dog after a winter storm in Minnesota,

The pension program in Minnesota is just 63.3% funded and is $37.2 billion in debt.

To fill its pension shortfall, the state would need to collect $6,681 from each resident — including adults and children. That would provide enough funding to pay out all of the retirement benefits promised to public employees in Minnesota.

The state, led by Gov. Tim Walz of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor party, currently has about 244,000 people working in state and local government.

14. New Hampshire

Boathouse and fall colors reflecting in Echo Lake, in Franconia Notch State Park, New Hampshire.
Jon Bilous / Shutterstock
New Hampshire's Echo Lake in the Fall.

The pension program in New Hampshire is just 62.7% funded and is $4.9 billion in debt.

To fill its pension gap, the state would need to collect $3,704 from each resident — including adults and children. That would provide enough funding to pay out all of the promised retirement benefits.

The state, led by Republican Gov. Chris Sununu, currently has roughly 56,000 state and local government employees who police highways, teach in schools and universities, fix roads, and provide many other state services.

13. New Mexico

Historic route 66 route marker sign in New Mexico
Andrey Bayda / Shutterstock
Route 66 marker in New Mexico.

The pension program in New Mexico is only 62.5% funded and is $16.5 billion in debt.

To fill its pension gap, the state would need to collect $7,882 from each resident — including adults and children. That would provide enough funding to pay out all of the retirement benefits promised to public employees in New Mexico.

The state, led by Democratic Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham, currently has about 112,000 state and local government workers.

12. Arizona

Phoenix, Arizona, USA downtown cityscape at dusk.
Sean Pavone / Shutterstock
Phoenix at dusk.

The pension program in Arizona is just 62.2% funded and is $27.4 billion in debt.

To fill its pension gap, Arizona would need to collect $3,745 from each resident, adults and kids. That would provide enough funding to pay out all of the promised retirement benefits.

The state, led by Republican Gov. Doug Ducey, has a state and local government workforce of around 258,000.

11. Mississippi

Welcome to Mississippi Gulf Coast sign on sandy beach in Gulfport
CrackerClips Stock Media / Shutterstock
A sign welcoming visitors to Mississippi's Gulf Coast.

The pension program in Mississippi is just 61.6% funded and is $16.8 billion in debt.

To fill its pension gap, the state would need to collect $5,720 from each resident — including adults and children. That would provide enough funding to pay out all of the retirement benefits promised to public employees in Mississippi.

The state, led by Republican Gov. Phil Bryant, currently has about 182,000 state and local government workers. They should have some savings to fall back on, too.

10. Massachusetts

Old woman sailing on the Charles river on sunny day  with happy on Boston city background.
2p2play / Shutterstock
A woman sailing on the Charles River in Boston.

The pension program in Massachusetts is just 59.9% funded and is $35.7 billion in debt.

To fill its pension gap, the state would need to collect $5,202 from each resident — including adults and children. That would provide enough funding to pay out all of the retirement benefits promised to state and local government employees in Massachusetts.

In this state, led by Republican Gov. Charlie Baker, there are currently an estimated 278,000 public employees providing a wide range of services.

9. Pennsylvania

Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.
Sean Pavone / Shutterstock
Independence Hall in Philadelphia.

The pension program in Pennsylvania is just 55.3% funded and is $66.7 billion in debt.

To fill its pension gap, the state would need to collect $5,207 from each resident — including adults and children. That would provide enough funding to pay out all of the promised retirement benefits.

The state, led by Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf, currently has approximately 514,000 state and local government employees who police highways, staff parks, guard prisons, and provide many other public services.

8. Hawaii

The Hawaii State Capitol is the official statehouse or capitol building of the U.S. state of Hawaii - Honolulu, USA
lkonya / Shutterstock
Hawaii's Capitol in Honolulu.

The pension program in Hawaii is just 54.8% funded and is nearly $13 billion in the red.

To fill its pension gap, the state would need to collect $9,058 from each resident, including adults and children. That would provide enough funding to pay out all of the retirement benefits promised to Hawaii state and local government employees.

The state, led by Democratic Gov. David Ige, currently has about 75,000 of those workers.

7. South Carolina

Historical downtown area of  Charleston, South Carolina, USA at twilight.
f11photo / Shutterstock
Historic downtown Charleston, South Carolina.

The pension program in South Carolina is just 54.3% funded and is $25.5 billion in debt.

To fill its pension gap, the state would need to collect $5,078 from each resident — including adults and children. That would provide enough funding to pay out all of the promised retirement benefits.

The state, led by Republican Gov. Henry McMaster, currently has about 247,000 state and local government workers.

6. Rhode Island

Woman on Beach Little Compton RI
Kate Elliott / Shutterstock
On the beach in Little Compton, Rhode Island.

The pension program in Rhode Island is just 53.7% funded and is $5.5 billion in debt.

To fill its pension gap, the state would need to collect $5,301 from each resident — including adults and children. That would provide enough funding to pay out all of the retirement benefits promised to state and local government employees in Rhode Island.

The state, led by Democratic Gov. Gina Raimondo, currently has nearly 44,000 employees who teach, fix roads, work in health care, and provide many other services.

5. Colorado

View of a Colorado ski resort on a nice winter day
LanaG / Shutterstock
Ski resort in Colorado.

The pension program in Colorado is just 47.1% funded and is $54.6 billion in debt.

To fill its pension gap, the state would need to collect $9,722 from each resident — including adults and children. That would provide enough funding to pay out all of the promised retirement benefits.

The state, led by Democratic Gov. Jared Polis, currently has an estimated 260,000 state and local government workers.

4. Connecticut

Connecticut State Capitol in Hartford, Connecticut.
Sean Pavone / Shutterstock
Connecticut's Capitol in Hartford.

The pension program in Connecticut is just 45.7% funded and is $34.8 billion in debt.

To fill its pension gap, the state would need to collect $9,933 from each resident — including adults and children. That would provide enough funding to pay out all of the retirement benefits promised to Connecticut state and local government employees.

The state, led by Democratic Gov. Ned Lamont, currently has around 152,000 of those workers.

3. Illinois

Chicago Skyline aerial view skyscrapers by the beach , vintage colors
marchello74 / Shutterstock
The Chicago skyline.

The pension program in Illinois is only 38.4% funded and is running a staggering $136.9 billion shortfall.

To fill its pension gap, the state would need to collect $10,707 from each resident — including adults and children. That would provide enough funding to pay out all of the promised retirement benefits.

The state, led by Democratic Gov. J.B. Pritzker, currently has roughly 528,000 state and local government employees.

2. New Jersey

Train fast moving in Hoboken station, New York City.
pisaphotography / Shutterstock
A train pulling through the station in Hoboken, New Jersey.

The pension program in New Jersey is just 35.8% funded and is in the hole by a colossal $142.3 billion, according to the data from the Pew Charitable Trusts.

To close its pension gap, the state would need to collect $16,009 from each resident, including adults and children, says the Foundation for Economic Education.

That would provide enough funding to pay out all of the retirement benefits that have been promised to state and local government employees in New Jersey. There are roughly 410,000.

1. Kentucky

racing horse portrait in action on competition
olgaru79 / Shutterstock
The Kentucky Derby.

The nation's biggest pension problem is in the Bluegrass State. The program in Kentucky is only 33.9% funded and is $42.9 billion in debt.

To fill its pension gap, the state would need to collect $9,632 from each adult and child. That would provide enough funding to pay out all of the retirement benefits promised to public employees in Kentucky.

The state, led by Republican Gov. Matt Bevin, currently has around 194,000 state and local government workers, according to Governing.com data.