For most people, moving out on their own is an exciting moment in their life. It is complete independence, and relying on yourself to make wise decisions in a multitude of facets in your life --- including money. One thing that many people are shocked by when first moving out on their own is the way that utility bills add up fast.

While this can be stressful, not all hope is lost. We've compiled a list of 6 easy-to-use tips that will help you to reduce your energy usage and in turn, save you money on your bills.

1. Invest in Ceiling Fans

For some reason, many people today assume that ceiling fans are a thing of the past. When really, they can save you a bundle on your energy bill. If you have a ceiling fan in your house and use it properly, you can cut back on your bill greatly. Now, problems can arise when people are unsure of how to use them correctly (yes, there really is a correct way using them). In order to be used correctly, ceiling fans should be set to spin counter-clockwise throughout the summer months, this will pull the hot air up to the ceiling and away from the living space. During the winter months, reverse the setting so that the fans blow the hot air down.

2. Practice Proper Filter Maintenance

In order to get the most out of your furnace, dryer and air conditioner it is imperative that you practice proper filter maintenance by changing the filter on your furnace regularly as recommended by their manufacturers. The majority of furnace manufacturers recommend doing changing your filter on a quarterly basis to keep the unit operating at peak efficiency.

If you use a smart thermostat, such as the Nest, the companion app will remind you when it's time to change your filter.

3. Don't be an Energy Sucker

This tip is actually quite simple. If you aren't using an appliance, unplug it. Many people don't think about the fact that when most appliances are on "standby" they continue to draw energy. Just think about all of those clocks blinking -12:00- that you haven't bothered to reset since the last time the power went out...

A great way of doing this is to have a couple of appliances plugged into the same extension cord –-- be careful not to add too many! By doing this, you avoid having to go around your house and unplug all of your small appliances, simply unplug the extension cord when you're done. The same can be done for small home office equipment and other clusters of electronics that do not necessarily need to be hooked up 24/7.

You can also invest in a smart power bar, which automatically cuts power to specific outlets, and thereby appliances, when they're not in use.

4. Invest in Energy Efficient Major Appliances

Purchasing major appliances that are energy efficient are something that more people care about today than ever before. Yes, it typically does cost more up front, but an energy efficient major appliance can help to keep even more of your hard-earned money in your pocket over time. Not only that, but a house full of energy efficient major appliances may help increase the resale value to your home.

5. Invest in Energy Efficient Doors and Windows

Just like investing in energy efficient appliances, investing in energy efficient doors and windows might cost some money upfront, but it will end up saving you a pretty penny in the long run. By investing in these, you are protecting your home from losing the warm or cool air that you've already paid for through expensive heating (typically gas or electricity) or cooling (electricity), while at the same time protecting your home from the bitter cold or sweltering outside temperatures.

6. Wash with Cold Water

Did you know that the cost of heating water or washing machine can more than double the cost of a load of laundry? This means that by simply washing certain clothes in cold water, you can halve the cost of a load of laundry. You may need special cold water detergent, but you will still come out ahead.

Evidently, there are a variety of ways to save money on your electricity bill, but we certainly haven't listed them all here. We encourage you to share your suggestions on ways to save money by saving energy in the comments below.

If you know somebody who could benefit from the information in this article, we encourage you to share it with them!



6 Easy Tips for Saving Money When Eating Out

6 Easy Tips for Saving Money When Eating Out

Did you know that on average, Americans spend more money on eating out than they do on actual groceries? That's some kind of crazy! Don't get me wrong, I enjoy grabbing dinner with friends or ordering pizza as much as the next person, but to spend more on that than on actual groceries seems a little excessive.

7 Tips for Saving Tons of Money by Changing Your Shopping and Cooking Habits

7 Tips for Saving Tons of Money by Changing Your Shopping and Cooking Habits

One of the biggest criticisms of young people's spending habits is how often they eat out. Older generations typically enjoyed a few meals out per month. Today, it's common to find the younger generation eating out ten to fifteen times per week!

7 Essentials That are Draining Your Bank Account

7 Essentials That are Draining Your Bank Account

Does this sound familiar? You get a $3 coffee every morning and pick up lunch from the deli most days. On Thursdays, it's drinks with friends and on Saturdays you shop for groceries. You need pick up a new pair of pants for work and dinner out with your new squeeze-and bam!

How to Get Strangers on the Internet to Pay Your Bills

How to Get Strangers on the Internet to Pay Your Bills

Crowdfunding has become an increasingly popular way to raise money for just about any cause you can think of. It’s a fairly straightforward way to fund a project: first, you pique people’s interest about your idea or cause online; then you encourage them to make contributions on a crowdfunding platform.

Have a Car? 7 Ways You Can Save Money on Running Costs

Have a Car? 7 Ways You Can Save Money on Running Costs

The convenience of owning a car comes at a hefty price. The average new vehicle costs more than $33,000 in the United States, say the automative experts at Kelley Blue Book, and that's not including the license and registration fees and the taxes you pay on top. Meanwhile, AAA's 2015 "Your Driving Costs" study found that it actually costs about $8,700 to own and drive the average car for 15,000 miles each year.